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The question is not what you look at but what you see. -Henry David Thoreau

Why do we question?

Questions are powerful tools. They can ignite hope and lead to new insights.

The right questions can help us develop a flexible, innovative approach and openness to others’ ideas and teamwork.

If we ask the wrong questions, then the answers, even if answered correctly, will lead us to the wrong conclusions.

As a thoughtful person, we must make a choice about how you will react to what we see and hear.

This lead us to alternative which is to just accept whatever we encounter which by doing so automatically results in us making someone else’s opinion our own.

A more active alternative consists of asking questions in an effort to reach a personal decision about the worth of what you have experienced.

Effective questions are questions that are powerful and thought provoking.

Effective questions are open-ended and not leading questions.

They are “what” or “how” questions rather that “why” questions.

When asking effective questions, it is important to wait for the answer and not provide the answer.

When working with people to solve a problem, it is not only to tell them what the problem is. It is equally important that they need to find out or understand it for themselves.

This can be achieving by asking them thought provoking questions.

Asking effective question actually is not enough if it is not pair with the ability to listen to the answer and suspend judgment.

This means being intent on understanding what the person who is talking is really saying.

In business situation, a client comes to us, not only for your ability to negotiate a settlement or draft a document, but also for our wisdom.

We proof our understanding or wisdom by listening to our client not just asking questions or delivering the service.

When clients listened to, they feel understood and are more trusting of us.

Effective listening is a skill that requires nurturing and needs development.

Whatever the question, the answers reinforce the assumption and provide an excuse for why we are not getting the results we want.

References:

  • Browne, M. Neil and Keeley, Stuart M, Asking the Right Questions – A Guide to Critical Thinking (Eighth Edition), 2007
  • coachingforchange.com
  • michaelhyatt.com